2019 Best Love Songs that Can Relate to Any Kind of Relationship

Love is real. It is compelling enough to connect people into entering a romantic relationship regardless of barriers.

Love songs can strengthen that bond, knowing you and your partner are not alone in experiencing the trials that so called odd-couples go through. They are just the same for romantic relationship involving opposite sexes, but sometimes more difficult if only a few understand the emotions and circumstances on which a different kind of love affair is founded.

Esquire whipped up a list of a dozen love songs that can touch the hearts of individuals engaged in any kind of relationship. We chose the top three, as they are excellent enough to serve as best examples of what love can be in any relationship.

“Just You and I” from Tom Walker

Cause my darling, you and I
Could take over the world
One step at a time
Just you and I (Just you and I)
‘Cause you’re the only one
Who brings light just like the sun
One step at a time
Just you and I

You can’t just give up on something just because of the bad times. Remember there is someone who has committed to stay by your side no matter what. That can very well be said of how you also intend to be toward your partner, when the situation gets reversed. “Just You and I” delivers the words of encouragements that two people need to hear when everything seems to go wrong.

Originally released as an accoustic music, Tom Walker’s new rendition is set to a good beat that can surely charge up a person’s resolve to overcome challenges and barriers.

‘The Bones” by Maren Morris

Maren Morris can really pack an album of powerful hits, even while singing a love song with bone rhetorics.

When the bones are good, the rest don’t matter
Yeah, the paint could peel, the glass could shatter
Let it rain ’cause you and I remain the same
When there ain’t a crack in the foundation

Keep that foundation strong just like your bones, because all other things that appear on the surface can easily get damaged by fears and doubts. As Morris sings about relationships, regardles of the kind you are in, the foundation that built the partnership will allow the two of you to stand firm on solid ground.

“Cuz I Love You” from Lizzo

Listen to Lizzo, who is all out with powerful emotions, singing about the things she does and will do for that special someone she loves. Maybe that is too much for some, but maybe just what love is all about, especially if it is a new relationship that you would like to last longer if not forever.

I thought that I didn’t care
I thought I was love-impaired
But baby, baby
I don’t know what I’m gonna do
I’m crying ’cause I love you, oh
Yes, you

Music Theory : Early Stages in the Development of Music Theories

It is widely believed that music first took form in rhythmic patterns of claps, along with beats and taps, presumably with the use of sticks or stones. Then there was shamanism, and various forms of ethnic religions. Their rituals devised methods of producing sounds by creating drums and rattles, as means of communicating with summoned spirits. Yet as the series of chants and incantations were developed to invoke mystical powers, there were no written forms or notations in place, to use as teaching or learning guides.

As music forms advanced in ancient Mesopotamian and Egyptian civilizations, several other musical instruments like sistras, lures, flutes, oboes, trumpets, harps and organs were invented. Archaeologists noted that during the 14th century BC in ancient Mesopotamia and Egypt, musical theory already existed by way of a heptatonic system. Heptatonic refers to a system of producing music using seven different pitches per octave.

Still, the development of classical music is attributed to the ancient Greek civilization, since the octave musical theory was formally established and developed in Greece in 600 BC.

Beginnings of Classical Music Transpired in Ancient Greece

There is strong evidence that classical music came about when renowned Greek mathematician Pythagoras, took to studying music as a science, to which he developed the octave as a foundation of music.

Although many scholars contend that the Mesopotamians and Egyptians were the first to produce music in different pitches, Pythagoras, thru his inquiries and observations made popular the notion that inherent ratios existed between pitches. He went on to establish the music theory that the length, size and or weight of a music-producing element was instrumental in creating a tone that is a pitch higher after a series of eight tones.

The scientific studies of music continued in Ancient Greece, with the likes of Pythagoras, Philodemus, Aristides and Aristoxenus contributing their musical theory about rhythm, harmonics and metre. Compilations of their musical theories went on to influence advancements in the development of music in ancient Rome, by the early Christian churches, and subsequently by medieval composers,